Book a Kavala Ferry

Kavala ferries connect Greece with Aegean Islands, Ikaria, Samos, Lesbos & Cyclades Islands with crossings available to Agios Efstratios, Limnos, Chios & Fournoi (in Aegean Islands), Lavrio & Piraeus (in Greece), Agios Kirikos & Evdilos (in Ikaria), Karlovassi & Vathi (in Samos), Mytilene (in Lesbos) & Mykonos & Syros (in Cyclades Islands). Sailings from Kavala are operated by numerous ferry companies.

There are up to 13 ferry crossings daily from Kavala with sailing durations starting from 3 hours. Our Kavala ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Kavala

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Kavala Ferry Alternatives

Kavala Ferry Services

  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 6 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 3 hr
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 14 hr
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 20 hr
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 17 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 10 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 12 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 14 hr 50 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 7 hr 15 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 13 hr 50 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 17 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 20 hr 40 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 21 hr 45 min
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Kavala Ferry Port

Kavala Port lies on the coast of Northern Greece, and is the main port for the city of Kavala, Greece’s second largest city in the northern region. The historic buildings paint Kavala as one of the most picturesque cities in Greece, and when the sea breeze flows through the streets it creates an energy that is unique to the city. The port itself prompted the evolution of the city’s progression and became the gateway to ports around the Aegean Sea and the coast of Asia Minor. In modern times, the port is primarily used for fishing and public transport, though it is also home to a growing water sports scene.

The city has shred its tag of the ‘Mecca of Tobacco’ which it was labelled during the time the bourgeoisie were beginning to take command of the city. The enigmatic character of the city is still intact, though it has recently become a much friendlier and welcoming town. The port is particularly welcoming; several thousand visitors pass through the terminal each year, with daily crossings during the summer months.

The port offers sailings to many nearby islands and resorts, including the Aegean Islands, Lesbos and other islands belonging to Greece. The ferry companies offering the crossings are considered to be the best in the region, and offer food and drink to passengers whilst on board.