Book a Kea Ferry

Kea ferries connect Cyclades Islands with Greece with crossings available to Kythnos, Syros, Folegandros, Ios, Kimolos, Milos, Naxos, Paros, Mykonos, Serifos & Sifnos (in Cyclades Islands) & Lavrio (in Greece). Sailings from Kea are operated by numerous ferry companies.

There are up to 12 ferry crossings daily from Kea with sailing durations starting from 1 hour. Our Kea ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Kea

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Kea Ferry Services

  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 1 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 1 hr
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 3 hr 45 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 11 hr 50 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 10 hr 25 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 10 hr 5 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 14 hr 35 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 8 hr 30 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 7 hr 10 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 5 hr 20 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 8 hr 10 min
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  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 9 hr 5 min
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Kea Ferry Port

There is no better metaphor for the laid-back nature of Kea Island than the statue of its mascot: a lion, grinning from whisker to whisker, lounging upon a rock in a state of complete satisfaction. For although Kea is found in the northern reaches of the Cyclades archipelago close to the populous Greek mainland region of Attica, it has somehow managed to escape the boisterous boom of tourism.

Instead the island is a peaceful haven shaped by rolling hills and valleys that stretch from coast to coast; the steep slopes covered in straw-coloured shrubs and grasses, and the blossoming trees of the local vineyards and almond groves. The shallows of the Aegean Sea surrounding Kea seem to have been tailor-made for scuba diving too. The rugged shoreline is pitted with isolated coves and underwater caverns that teem with marine life, while the wrecks of old ships (including the world-famous sister-vessel of the Titanic: HMS Britannic), are begging to be explored from their resting places on the sea floor.

The port in Kea is found in the picturesque village of Korissia on the island’s jagged northern coast. It sits at the far-end of the concrete promenade that runs along one edge of the ultramarine bay, separating the classic, white-walled villas from the gently lapping waves. It a relatively small facility that, like the rest of Kea, never gets busy enough for the noise to rise above a gentle hubbub. There are no amenities at the port itself, though there a few shops, cafes, restaurants and even an ATM machine nearby.

Despite being sparsely populated and largely covered in rough hills, there are plenty of paved road routes that tie together all the villages across the oval-shaped isle. The main route snakes in a vague circle around the heart of Kea; stretching from the centre of Korissia to the village of Kampi further along the coast. A system of buses and taxis regularly run from the port too, whisking passengers towards the island’s major landmarks.

A number of ferry routes currently operate from the port in Korissia a few times throughout the week. Services hosted by Hellenic Seaways sail south to the neighbouring islands of Syros, Naxos, Paros and Folegandros as well as heading the short distance north to the port of Lavrio on the Greek mainland.