Book a Salerno Ferry

Salerno ferries connect Italy with Sicily, Tunisia & Gulf of Napoli with crossings available to Palermo & Messina (in Sicily), Tunis (in Tunisia), Amalfi & Positano (in Italy) & Capri (in Gulf of Napoli). Salerno Ferry crossings are operated by Grimaldi Lines, Caronte & Tourist, NLG & Travelmar and depending on time of year you’ll find a choice of up to 17 ferry crossings daily.

There are up to 17 ferry crossings daily from Salerno with sailing durations starting from 35 minutes. Our Salerno ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Salerno

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Salerno Ferry Alternatives

Salerno Ferry Services

  • Grimaldi Lines
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 10 hr 1 min
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  • Grimaldi Lines
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 23 hr 31 min
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  • Caronte & Tourist
    • 6 Sailings Weekly 9 hr
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  • NLG
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 40 min
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  • Travelmar
    • 5 Sailings Daily 35 min
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  • NLG
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 35 min
    • Get price
  • Travelmar
    • 6 Sailings Daily 1 hr 10 min
    • Get price
  • NLG
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 1 hr 30 min
    • Get price

Salerno Guide

Salerno is a town and a province capital in Campania, south-western Italy, located on the gulf of the same name on the Tyrrhenian Sea. Salerno's history dates from its establishment as a Roman town in about 194 BC after the wars with Hannibal the Great. It is situated on a natural harbor which has facilitated trade from ancient times to the present, and which was used by the allied forces as a landing place during the Italian campaign in World War II. Behind the city is a high rock surmounted by an ancient castle, the Castle of Arechi, which commands a view overlooking the city and the Bay. Like other cities and towns in southern Italy, Salerno has been washed over by succeeding dynasties and empires, all of which have had an influence on the evolution of the city, physically and culturally. After the Romans, the Samnites, followed by the Saracens and Lombards, and of course the Byzantines and Normans.