Book a Venice Ferry

Venice ferries connect Italy with Slovenia, Croatia, Greece with crossings available to Piran (in Slovenia), Pula, Porec, Rovinj & Umag (in Croatia), Igoumenitsa & Patras (in Greece) & Ancona (in Italy). Venice Ferry crossings are operated by Venezia Lines, Minoan Lines, Anek Superfast & Atlas Kompas and depending on time of year you’ll find a choice of up to 48 ferry crossings weekly.

There are up to 14 ferry crossings daily from Venice with sailing durations starting from 2 hours 30 minutes. Our Venice ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Venice

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Venice Ferry Alternatives

Venice Ferry Services

  • Venezia Lines
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 2 hr 30 min
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  • Venezia Lines
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 3 hr 15 min
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  • Atlas Kompas
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 3 hr
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  • Venezia Lines
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 2 hr 45 min
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  • Atlas Kompas
    • 5 Sailings Weekly 3 hr
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  • Venezia Lines
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 3 hr 45 min
    • Get price
  • Atlas Kompas
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 3 hr
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  • Venezia Lines
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 2 hr 45 min
    • Get price
  • Atlas Kompas
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 3 hr
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  • Minoan Lines
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 25 hr 30 min
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  • Anek Superfast
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 25 hr 30 min
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  • Minoan Lines
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 31 hr 30 min
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  • Anek Superfast
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 32 hr
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  • Minoan Lines
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 6 hr
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Venice Guide

Venice the "city of canals", is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice in Italy. It comprises of over 100 islands, many of them linked by bridges and the largest criss-crossed by blue-green canals to facilitate the endless traffic - all of it floating. Located in the Venetian lagoon, a large inlet on the Adriatic Sea, Venice was founded in 421 AD. From 1000 AD to about 1630 AD, it was a powerful maritime empire controlling the spice trade and ruled by a succession of toughminded, and sometimes bloody, Dukes - or Doges as they were called locally. The city's incredible wealth found expression in gilded palaces and merchant villas lining the main thoroughfare, the Grand Canal. The personal wealth of the powerful enabled them to commission works from the finest Italian and foreign artists for the decoration of their palazzos, guild halls and churches. It is the legacy of this civil munificence which attracts art-lovers today.